Ahoy!

Discussion in 'New Member Introductions' started by Thom, Jul 10, 2014.

  1. Thom Barefooters

    Member Since:
    Jul 9, 2014
    Message Count:
    3
    Hi. (Yes, this might be a long introduction, but I suppose that you just don't stumble across barefootrunning).

    My name is Thomas, I'm from Denmark, and as many others on this forum, I have also decided to go barefoot :)
    I have always been a very active person, competing and participating in several kinds of sports - and I have as well, spent a lot of time running, simply because I enjoy it.

    However, for the past year, I have been through a lot of trouble with both shinsplints, and jumpers knee. Until recently, I had never really given neither my running technique or my footwear ANY consideration - it was simply how it was, and how it always has been.

    Since january, I've spent a lot of time on boxing - which has been great, as it hasnt put as much stress onto my knees and shins, as running would do - so even though I havnt been running that much for the past year, I've still stayed in shape.

    Anyway, it then became summer, and about a month ago, I simply couldn't restrain myself.
    I set out, running 21 km on my first day back on the road - maybe not the smartest move, but I like to push my limits - and until that day, the farthest I had ever run, was propably no more than 11 km.

    Everything went well though, but I knew that it wouldnt last, if I kept on going like that.
    I decided to get myself some new running shoes - some that would encourage minimalist running. Somehow I ended up buying the Nike Free 5.0. I went for a run - a great run!
    By switching to these, with remarkabely less sole and cushioning than my old shoes, I felt an enormous change in my running style.

    But, after a couple of weeks, my neverending shin and knee problems returned - I had propably pushed it to far, but I refused to believe, that this had to be such a gigantic issue.
    After some research, I became aware, that barefoot running was the way to go - just by doing the 100-up excercise, I knew it was the right thing.

    Which brings me to two days ago - my first barefoot run.
    Starting out was amazing, just incredible! I could feel that my legs werent stressed by my movements at all, and I knew that I could keep on going like it for hours!

    Ofcourse, my feet did not agree, after 5 minutes, I had already ripped the skin of the balls of my feet, and my left little toe, had become one large wound - defeated, I turned around, but this has only left me more excited for my next run.

    Since I've barely been able to walk, I've spent the past couple of days reviewing my technique, to figure out what had gone wrong (apart from my delicate feet).

    I'm pretty sure, that I'm now on the right track, and that I now know, exactly how I should approach my next run - which leaves me extremely excited, almost ecstatic, to get going again. Barefootrunning will without a doubt, become a huge factor in my life, and hopefully tomorrow, my feet will be ready to go again.
    Phil Hart, Sid, paulbeales and 2 others like this.
  2. johan131 Chapter Presidents
    1. Nederland -...
    2. Presidents

    Member Since:
    Mar 1, 2014
    Message Count:
    117
  3. Barefoot TJ Administrator
    1. Nomad
    2. Presidents

    Member Since:
    Mar 5, 2010
    Message Count:
    16,150
    Welcome! Asks lots of questions.

    ________________________

    Phil Hart likes this.
  4. happysongbird Chapter Presidents
    1. Idaho
    2. Presidents

    Member Since:
    Jul 1, 2011
    Message Count:
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    Nice to have you here. It is exciting to feel how good it feels, but don't be impatient with letting your soles heal up before going again. Baby steps. :)

    ________________________

    Phil Hart and johan131 like this.
  5. Thom Barefooters

    Member Since:
    Jul 9, 2014
    Message Count:
    3
    Thanks guys.

    Yeah I know, and I'm on top of it :) Think I might do a lot of running on grass for a while, propably ending each run on tougher surface - that way I'll be able to cover some distance as well :)
    happysongbird likes this.
  6. Sid Barefooters

    Member Since:
    Jan 1, 2011
    Message Count:
    2,151
    Welcome!

    Running on grass won't help you learn how to run on pavement. However, if you will be always running on grass, then there's no need to learn how to run on pavement. :D

    It's important to learn how to pay attention to your feet. Don't run until your feet are a bloody mess. Experienced barefooters will stop at the first sign of pain. They will shift their weight immediately when stepping on something unpleasant. This does take time and experience.
    Phil Hart likes this.
  7. Thom Barefooters

    Member Since:
    Jul 9, 2014
    Message Count:
    3
    I know, which I why I'd be doing both :) Since I currently can't go for more than 20 minutes on pavement, I just figured I'd do some running on grass as well, since 20 minutes, is quite a short run - too short for my taste :)
  8. johan131 Chapter Presidents
    1. Nederland -...
    2. Presidents

    Member Since:
    Mar 1, 2014
    Message Count:
    117
    I think your body is telling you something, if I may, actually that it's enough for today. Not listening to your feet/body signals will destroy every advantage barefoot running has. The people responding above were trying not to 'push' it think. In my opinion you should take their advice very literally or read more carefully! I would say: Listen! To your feet (the best running coaches ever) in first place and in second to the very experienced people on this forum (and their books and writings). Have fun!

    Mileage will come before you know it and will never come when you push it.
  9. Phil Hart Barefooters
    1. North Carolina

    Member Since:
    Aug 13, 2010
    Message Count:
    940
    Welcome Thom. Slow and steady is the only way to make a successful barefoot transition. Very slow and steady. Sooner or later, you will have to slow down and make this transition; the question is whether you do it after repeated injuries or not. I chose the "after repeated injuries path" and frankly cannot recommend it. I would suggest finding an alternative cardio fitness exercise while you make the shod-to-BF running transition, like walking, swimming, biking or even running some distance in shoes (although I found that harder to do with every day of BF running). Glad to have you with us, and I wish for you a wiser transition than I made.

    ________________________

    johan131 and happysongbird like this.

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